Bringing ADA Restoration to the Heart of America

Posted on 30 October 2007. Filed under: ADA Restoration Act of 2007, Advocacy |

If you have been staying on top of what’s happening with the ADA Restoration Act then you know that the Freedom Bus has been touring across the country to bring educational exhibits and speeches to ordinary Americans in ordinary towns. The Freedom Bus tour is meant to help people understand why ALL of us, with or without disabilities, ought to support the ADA Restoration Act. They have evidently been busy lately, with a trip both to Tennesee and also to Indiana.

Freedom Bus Tries to Crash through the Barriers in TN this week, Oct 28 ’07, Public News Service reports on the Freedom Bus and its visit to Memphis Tennessee to help raise awareness of the ADA Restoration Act.

Everybody Counts on the Road to Freedom, Oct 26 ’07; the Road to Freedom Bus has made 65 stops in 44 states to raise awareness of the ADA Restoration Act—the latest in northwest Indiana.


PLEASE make an ASL vlog (or a written blog, if you like) on the ADA Restoration Act! If you do, I’d be delighted to link to you!

CCD has compiled an excellent collection of materials on the ADA and on the ADA Restoration Act of 2007, so it’s well worth following their link to www.c-c-d.org/ada.

See my continually-updated list of blog entries from all over the web about the ADA Restoration Act of 2007, always available from the top navigation bar at “On the ADA Restoration Act.”

See examples of specific court cases that have served to undermine the spirit and intent of the Americans with Disabilities Act: click on “ADA Court Cases” under “categories” in the right-hand navigation bar. I still have a few more ADA Court Cases in the coming few weeks.

Also, don’t miss these links: One group of activists has posted a short list of simple ideas of things you can do to help get the Restoration Act passed. And do check out the ADA Restoration Blog for updates. Or browse through background information on the ADA Restoration Act. Or contact your legislators.

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4 Responses to “Bringing ADA Restoration to the Heart of America”

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I am a university student in the state of Indiana, for two years I tried to get accommodation from national testing services for graduate school, with no success. I have traumatic brain injury, but it has not stop me from a 3.70 grade point average. What I have noted that all of my white friends with similar injuries receive testing accommodations, while other minorities like myself have to seek legal assistance to get accommodations from MCAT, LSAT, and GRE. Since that time it has been discovered that this is a practice with the testing services aimed out pushing us out of the graduate process.

I am a university student in the state of Indiana, at one of the top ranked university’s. For two and a half years, I tried to get accommodation from national testing services for graduate school, with no success. I have traumatic brain injury, and I need extra time, but it has not stop me from a 3.70 grade point average. What I have noted in all of this, is that all of my white friends with similar injuries receive testing accommodations. While other minorities like myself have to seek legal assistance to get accommodations from MCAT, LSAT, and GRE, or defer their dreams of graduate school because they don’t have the money for an attorney. Since then it has been discovered that this is a practice across the country with the testing services, aimed at pushing minority students out of the graduate process all together. They never say no, that just don’t say anything… No matter how many times you send them your files of the same documentation.

I am a university student in the state of Indiana, at one of the top ranked university’s. For two and a half years, I tried to get accommodation from national testing services for graduate school, with no success. I have traumatic brain injury and I need extra time, but my injuries have not stop me from maintaining a 3.70 grade point average. What I have noted in all of this, is that all of my white friends with similar injuries receive testing accommodations, and some are not as serious as my injury. While other minorities like myself have to seek legal assistance to get accommodations from MCAT, LSAT, and GRE, or defer their dreams of graduate school forever because they don’t have the money for an attorney. Since then it has been discovered that this is a practice across the country with the testing services, aimed at pushing minority students out of the graduate process all together. My question is that I contacted my congressman, and did get the correct help, I contacted ADA, and still didn’t get any help… So, what good is a restoration of the ADA, when I can’t even as a truly disabled person sit at the table?

Thanks for sharing your story, Beryl. I had not heard of the specific type of situation you describe before. But I have known two very bright Deaf students who happen to be people of color. They both had to overcome both a lot of audism (prejudice against deaf people) and also racism to get to where they are. Many of their former classmates and teachers are now quite astonished to know that they not only DID go to college (against all of THEIR expectations) but now have masters degrees and good careers.

Either racism or disablism can be big challenges by themselves. The combined effect, I know, can be even more challenging.

A lot of racism I think happens by a subconscious process (meaning, they “don’t mean to be racist”)–but in some ways that can make it even harder to fight because then you have to convince people that, yes, there IS still an institutionalized pattern of behavior that DOES disproportionately impact people with disabilities and/or people of color even if people geunuinely “didn’t mean it to.” Sometimes that can be trickier to fight than intentional discrimination.

Good luck with your endeavors. Only by pushing onwards, and pointing to racist and/or disablist patterns when they occur, can we progress as a society.


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